Tanzania joins globe on climate change action

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On 18 March 2017 at 12:03

Tanzania will join 172 other countries across the globe in taking action on climate change, ten years after the world’s first earth hour public celebration, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), organisers confirmed.
WWF Tanzania Country Director, Dr Amani Ngusaru, said every individual has a role to play in changing climate change because climate change is not only an environmental issue.
It cuts across through all other aspects, be it political, Social, economic even health. “The effects of (...)

Tanzania will join 172 other countries across the globe in taking action on climate change, ten years after the world’s first earth hour public celebration, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), organisers confirmed.

WWF Tanzania Country Director, Dr Amani Ngusaru, said every individual has a role to play in changing climate change because climate change is not only an environmental issue.

It cuts across through all other aspects, be it political, Social, economic even health. “The effects of climate change threaten our path to sustainable livelihoods. We hold the power to change climate action,” he said.

Expounding further, he said Earth Hour will work closely with the government in Kisarawe to revive a big part of the protected Pugu forest that was destroyed by fire last year. He said a total of 1,000 trees will be planted at Pugu Forest.

This will go hand in hand with the introduction of improved cooking stoves. “These stoves are very efficient as they use very little charcoal, they are convenient and households will reduce a great amount of charcoal,” read in part, a statement released by WWF Country Communication Manager, Ms Joan Itanisa.

In a press statement yesterday, Ms Itanisa said in her press statement released yesterday that the WWF’s landmark movement is set to once again unite millions of people around the globe to shine a light on climate action.

“The planet continues to witness climate records being broken and the need for greater ambition and commitment acceleration, the world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment is mobilizing individuals, communities and organisations globally to do their part to help change climate change,” she said.

She also said in her statement that since 2007 as a single-city event, Earth Hour is now celebrated across all continents. In the past decade, as global climate efforts gained momentum, “Earth Hour has helped bridge the gap between the grassroots and the corridors of power,” Ms Itanisa said.

Earth Hour Global Executive Director, Mr Siddarth Das, explained that the Earth Hour that started in 2007 to show leaders that climate change was an issue people cared about.

The director also said that for that symbolic moment to turn into the global movement it is today, is really humbling and speaks volumes about the powerful role of people in issues that affect their lives.

“Every flick of a switch or click online is a reminder that people see themselves as an integral part of climate action and it is this kind of collective determination we need to tackle the most pressing environmental challenge our planet has ever faced,” he said.

The director said in 2017, WWF and Earth Hour teams around the world will be using the movement to shine a light on the climate issue most relevant in their country or region.

Source:Daily News


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