At 17, Niyigena makes machines that brood and hatch eggs

By Alain Jules Hirwa
On 22 January 2020 at 06:40

Niyigena Théogène uses old metals, wood, and other materials to make flat-irons for pressing clothes and machines that brood and hatch eggs.

Aged 17, he lives in Gatanga Village, Karenge Cell, Rwimbogo Sector in Rusizi District. He, since childhood, has always been curious to know the functioning of tools and wanted to make them.

As a child, he used to see a sparrowhawk picking up chicks, and that inspired his idea of a machine that broods and hatches eggs.

He says, “In my childhood, when I kept chicken, they hatched eggs and sparrowhawks would take them away. I then got an idea of a machine that hatches the eggs and keeps the chicks. At first, I failed to make the machine, but I finally found some few materials and started putting them together to make the machine.”

Niyigena adds that for him to make the machine, he made internet research which enabled him to get an idea of how to make the tool that increases and decreases temperature.

“I used the internet, and copied how it is made. The tool I made increases or decreases the temperature as you wish. What this machine does is brood eggs, hatches them, and keeps them for two weeks until they are tangible,” he says.

Niyigena says that among the challenges he faced was a lack of internet that slowed down his research and implementation of his ideas.

Today, he also makes flat-irons for ironing clothes. Showing one of his flat boxes he says; “This is a flat-iron made from wood, a piece of metal, clay, and wires.”

His materials are sometimes bought or collected from a place where they prepare metals. “Upon knowing the name of a material that I need, I buy it.

He got the skills while studying at Groupe Scolaire de Mushaka. He advises his fellow youth is to believe that nothing is impossible.

“While studying at Mushaka, I used to make research, sometimes on the weekend, or at night. We did not study this at school. It’s all about commitment. Don’t say it’s for white people. Instead, try it out and make it yourself,” he says.

He has sold two of the machines, each one at Rwf 100,00. He is taking sciences at a school in Nkombo Island, Rusizi District.

Niyigena Théogène uses old metals, wood, and other materials to make flat-irons for pressing clothes and machines that brood and hatch eggs.
Niyigena says that among the challenges he faced was a lack of internet that slowed down his research and implementation of his ideas.
At 17, Niyigena makes machines that brood and hatch eggs

Advertisement

YOUR OPINION ABOUT THIS ARTICLE

RULES AND REGULATIONS
Kwamamaza