Genocide convicts urged to support unity and reconciliation initiatives through remorse behavior

By IGIHE
On 9 October 2019 at 02:14

Convicts of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi detained in Musanze prison have been argued to apologize to survivors they offended.

The call was made yesterday by CGP George Rwigamba, the Commissioner-General of Rwanda Correctional Service, during a training session on unity and reconciliation with the aim of linking families that survived the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi and genocide perpetrators detained in Musanze prison.

Musanze prison is home to 213 genocide convicts of whom only 150 wrote letters requesting to link with offended families to seek an apology.

So far, 38 families were linked to genocide convicts and accepted their apologies.
Bazimenya Ezechiel, a genocide perpetrator in former Mukingo commune told IGIHE that he was forgiven after expressing remorse for his evil acts.

“I was Brigadier in former commune Mukingo during Genocide. I was managing delivering of guns. My acts left many families wiped out while others were orphaned. I fled to DRC after genocide and arrested upon return in 1996,” he said.

“Following ongoing talks on unity and reconciliation, I made a step further and apologized to all families I offended. My heart feels relieved and encourages others to do so,” added Bazimenya.

Some of the genocide survivors who forgave perpetrators request convicts to reveal the location of remains of victims to enable them a decent burial.

“I am among survivors orphaned by guns delivered by this man Barimenya to kill Tutsis. I forgave him after seeking an apology and live in harmony with his family. We request convicts to reveal where remains of our beloved ones were dumped,” said Ndangamira James.

said unity and reconciliation program is on the Government’s agenda and requested inmates to support it by apologizing to families they offended.

“Some of the genocide convicts were radical without any remorse but their mindsets change overtime and apologize to offended survivors. We are committed to gradually educating them to change for good and apologize,” he revealed.

Over 6000 of 32,000 genocide convicts countrywide have written letters to be linked with offended families for an apology.

Musanze prison is home to 213 genocide convicts of whom only 150 wrote letters requesting to link with offended families to seek an apology.

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