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Kigali Summit turns up pressure on world leaders as Malaria deaths reach highest number in nearly a decade

By IGIHE
On 25 mai 2022 at 10:15

In a world still reeling from the far-reaching impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, with global health security and pandemic preparedness remaining at the top of world leaders’ agendas, the next chapter of the Draw The Line Against Malaria campaign aims to turn up the pressure on world leaders to commit to ending malaria at the Kigali Summit and investing funds totalling US$18 billion at the Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment in New York this Autumn. Accounting for over half of global funding to end malaria, a fully replenished Global Fund is projected to enable countries and partners to reduce malaria deaths by 62%, treat 550 million malaria cases, and eliminate malaria from six more countries by 2026, as well as unlock the potential of a Zero Malaria world, helping to strengthen equitable health systems and improve the lives and futures of millions of people.

● In a critical year in the fight to end one of the world’s oldest and deadliest diseases within a generation, with game-changing high-level summits in both Rwanda and the USA, global stars have joined forces with youth and scientists from around the world, to turn up the pressure on world leaders to commit to ending malaria and invest funds totalling US$18 billion at the Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment, through the next exciting phase of the multi-award-winning Draw the Line Against Malaria campaign.

● Commonwealth leaders expect to meet at the eve of the 26th Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Kigali, Rwanda, where they will review the progress made against the commitment to halve malaria cases and recommit to its pledge on malaria. With only eight years left to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target on ending the epidemic of malaria, the Kigali Summit will also be an important steppingstone to the Seventh Replenishment of The Global Fund, in October 2022. The Global Fund has played a vital role in supporting countries to reduce the burden of malaria since its creation in 2002. In the face of resurgent malaria across the Commonwealth, ambitious pledges of support from Commonwealth members will be more important than ever.

● Over the past year a ground-breaking campaign, developed by dentsu International in 2021 as a youth pillar of the global Zero Malaria Starts With Me (ZMSWM) movement, has united people across the world at a time when malaria kills a child every minute, generating over 35 million engagements across the campaign’s website and social media channels.

● The Zero Malaria Starts with Me (ZMSWM) movement, endorsed in 2018 by H.E. President Paul Kagame of Rwanda in his role as Chair of the African Union, seeks to build community ownership of malaria efforts and increase political commitment for malaria elimination

● Rwanda’s progress since the commitment was agreed in 2018 has been significant. Between 2017 and 2020, the case incidence in the country decreased by more than two thirds, from 725/1,000 population at risk back down to 231/1,000 population at risk. This rate of progress has been maintained in the face of COVID-19.

● Rwanda’s joining the Zero Malaria campaign also unleashed new strategies to fight the disease using high tech drones to spray larvicides to reduce the adult population of mosquitoes and showcase other innovative vector control tools.

● The youth-focused Draw the Line Against Malaria campaign is part of the Zero Malaria Starts With Me (ZMSWM) movement that will see a stellar cast of international changemakers turn up the pressure in the fight against malaria today, launching the second chapter of the multi-award-winning campaign.

25th May 2022, Kigali : In a world still reeling from the far-reaching impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, with global health security and pandemic preparedness remaining at the top of world leaders’ agendas, the next chapter of the Draw The Line Against Malaria campaign aims to turn up the pressure on world leaders to commit to ending malaria at the Kigali Summit and investing funds totalling US$18 billion at the Global Fund’s Seventh Replenishment in New York this Autumn. Accounting for over half of global funding to end malaria, a fully replenished Global Fund is projected to enable countries and partners to reduce malaria deaths by 62%, treat 550 million malaria cases, and eliminate malaria from six more countries by 2026, as well as unlock the potential of a Zero Malaria world, helping to strengthen equitable health systems and improve the lives and futures of millions of people.

At the launch of the Zero Malaria Starts With Me (ZMSWM) movement in 2018 President Paul Kagame of Rwanda said : “The African continent accounts for over 90% of the global malaria burden. The campaign will reignite grassroot movements in which individuals, families, communities, religious leaders, private sector, political leaders, and other members of society pledge to take responsibility in the fight against malaria.”

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General says : “The World Health Organization welcomes a new host of scientists, youth, and champions to join the malaria fight at a crucial time when progress against the disease is lagging. Draw The Line provides a platform for Africa’s most powerful narrators to change this trajectory, disrupt political apathy, and lead the fight to end this treatable and preventable disease which kills a child nearly every minute.”

Dr Corine Karema, Interim CEO of the RBM Partnership to End Malaria says : “In addition to the innovation of new tools, we must invest in the country health systems and programmes needed to ensure these tools and resources target the right people and right places, at the right time. The Global Fund plays a critical role in delivering lifesaving malaria services where they are needed most. This year, it is vital that we see a fully replenished Global Fund to get back on track and accelerate the malaria response to end this disease and strengthen health systems, creating a safer, healthier and more equal world for all.”

Backed by the RBM Partnership to End Malaria, the second phase of Draw The Line is fronted by a stellar cast of young people, activists, scientists, and stars from Malaria No More UK Leadership Council founding member David Beckham and FC Barcelona striker Pierre Emerick Aubameyang, to marathon world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge and Afropop singer Yemi Alade.

TEAMING UP TO FIGHT FOR WHAT COUNTS – LINE BY LINE

The fast-paced new Draw The Line film, directed by Grammy-winning Meji Alabi, builds on the ground-breaking momentum of the first phase of the campaign, delivering an urgent message highlighting the fight against malaria, whilst encouraging leaders that this is a fight we can win with the right arsenal of tools, strong funding commitments, and renewed political will.

Launching on Africa Day on May 25th, the new campaign film is fronted by malaria champion David Beckham ; international footballing star Pierre Emerick Aubameyang ; Kenyan Olympic Gold-medalist and marathon world record-holder Eliud Kipchoge ; Nigerian Afropop singer, songwriter and actress Yemi Alade ; South African television presenter Bonang Matheba ; and Kenyan 2016 Rio Olympic and 2020 Tokyo Olympic running champion Faith Kipyegon.

David Beckham says : “I have supported the fight against malaria for many years and am proud to be a part of this amazing campaign, alongside many inspiring artists, athletes and champions from across Africa. This is a year of big opportunity and there is a way of curing this disease. World leaders have the power and responsibility to make change and create a safer, healthier, fairer world for all.”

The short film will be rolled out on channels and platforms across the world, including being showcased at the Paramount/MTV Africa Day Concert on 28th May 2022 in Johannesburg, ahead of the Kigali Summit on Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases being held on the eve of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Rwanda on 23rd June.

The Summit is a milestone moment in the malaria fight and enabler of game-changing political decisions including delivering on the commitment to halve malaria across the Commonwealth by 2023 and accelerate global efforts to cut malaria by 90% by 2030.

It is here that the Muundo artwork, as a representation of the collective will of young people, will be delivered to world leaders in Kigali. At the Summit, Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will participate as Chief Storyteller and the event will open with a performance from MTV/VMA award winning Rwandan choreographer Sherrie Silver and her dance crew.

Pierre Emerick Aubameyang says : “I am proud to be a voice for this campaign at such a significant time with big decisions ahead. I caught malaria in 2021 when playing for the national team in Gabon where 100% of the population is at risk from malaria. It was a tough time, I was lucky to be able to get to a doctor, in time to make a full recovery, but so many people don’t have access to essential medical care, especially children. As a dad I find it totally unacceptable that malaria takes the life of a child every minute when it can be prevented, treated and cured.”

A SEMINAL YEAR IN THE MALARIA FIGHT : WHY NOW IS THE TIME TO STEP UP ACTION

The latest World Malaria Report figures show that disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to an additional 47,000 malaria deaths between 2019 and 2020, with a total of 627,000 lives lost to malaria in 2020 – the highest number in nearly a decade.

Children are especially vulnerable, accounting for 80% of malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa, with around 481,500 losing their lives across the Continent.

The increases in malaria cases and deaths seen in 2020 come on the back of years of plateaued funding, which has been compounded by emerging threats from the natural world, such as growing drug and insecticide resistance, as well as disruption to malaria prevention and treatment services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and other humanitarian emergencies. The fight against malaria is at a precarious juncture, and without immediate and accelerated action further ground may be lost.

The latest figures also show that malaria places an even greater burden on fragile health systems than previously thought, reducing their ability to identify emerging diseases. Investments to end malaria are therefore a pathfinder for pandemic preparedness and response, helping build resilient and sustainable health systems and strengthening country capacity to fight this pandemic and be prepared for future threats.

The Draw The Line Against Malaria campaign was created by dentsu International, with art direction by artist Láolú Senbanjo and films directed and produced by Black Dog Films on behalf of the RBM Partnership to End Malaria in collaboration with global malaria partners and a coalition of agencies and non-profit organisations, including the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA), the African Union Commission, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Speak Up Africa, Impact Santé Afrique, Malaria No More UK, and Goodbye Malaria.


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